CARE Network Donation & Coexistence Initiatives

CARE Network Donation & Coexistence Initiatives

Soon the west coast will have an animal shelter outfitted to not only keep the dogs and cats of our region safe, but also the wild animals who we share this special peninsula with. Thanks to the $30,000 donation from Ocean Outfitters, CARE Network has now raised enough funds to establish the first phase of this important, regional resource. This large donation, which is made possible by guests joining us on our tours, is part of our larger carnivore co-existence initiative.

The region’s new animal shelter and care facility will temporarily house injured, ill, neglected and stray dogs, cats and other animals in need. When left in our communities, these animals often suffer and public safety is compromised. For instance, these suffering animals can become attractants to wildlife resulting in tragic conflict situations. CARE’s new facility will help solve some of these challenges faced across the region, from Ahousaht to Hitacu.

Tranquil Watershed Restoration Update

Tranquil Watershed Restoration Update

We have committed $200,000.00/year to monitor and restore the Tranquil River in Tla-o-qui-aht Territory. Central Westcoast Forest Society (CWFS) installed a rotary screw trap which was in place from March 28 until early June. CWFS had over 100 volunteers come out to help them count fish daily! They identified, weighed, measured and re-release 1,255 Chinook, 4,882 Coho, and 21,046 Chum. Visible parasites, scars and deformities were also noted. In collaboration with Dr. Kristi Miller's lab, samples were collected for further disease and pathogen testing. Samples were also collected for stomach content analysis in both the river and the estuary in collaboration with Will Duguid' lab at the University of Victoria. 

Guest Post: The most amazing pelagic of my life!

Guest Post: The most amazing pelagic of my life!

The most amazing pelagic of my life! - GUADALUPE AND SCRIPPS'S MURRELET, SLATY-BACKED GULL AND MANX SHEARWATER - all on the same trip!!

Yesterday I had the most amazing pelagic of my life and we didn't even find a fishing boat!. This has now topped the two pelagics where I've seen 3 Short- tailed albatross and 15 Laysan and 1 Short-tailed Albatross.

We left Ocean Outfitters at 8 am on the "Miss B Haven." We first saw a Manx Shearwater that Tom Plath spotted by Cleland Island. Artie Ahier found a Manx Shearwater on August 13 and 15th but after reviewing photos we now all believe that our bird was different. Our bird is much more ratty and worn and missing primaries. This is very much unlike Artie's bird which is very clean and missing none! See HERE. It is pretty cool to know there are at least 2 Manx's out there!. It was really special for Liron and Ilya to finally see a Manx Shearwater it was a lifer for all of us. This is not the reason it is special though.... In 2017 we did a young birder pelagic trip and Liam Singh spotted a Manx and all 3 of us were not looking the right way and we missed it!. The bird only stayed a few seconds and we were all pretty down so this sighting yesterday was all the more sweeter!

We're Taking Action on Climate Change

We're Taking Action on Climate Change

Ocean Outfitters is a Carbon Neutral company with Offsetters, Canada’s leading carbon management solutions provider. This means we have measured our greenhouse gas emissions, are working to reduce them as much as possible and that we’ve offset our footprint by contributing to projects that prevent the equivalent amount of emissions. This year we have also decided to go beyond Carbon Neutrality to offset 120% of our emissions towards projects in BC, Canada, and around the world. Offsetters’ projects are verified and validated by third parties to ensure that the emission reductions are real, additional and permanent. By supporting these projects, we prevent the equivalent amount of greenhouse gas emissions that we would have emitted if we didn’t offset.

Plankton Tuesdays Return!

Plankton Tuesdays Return!

Plankton are organisms that live in the ocean, drifting with tides and currents. Boring?

Hardly! Collectively, plankton fuel the entire marine ecosystem and represent the vast majority of the ocean's total biomass. This incredibly varied group includes everything from algae encased in jewel-like glass shells, to fierce and deadly predators - and their elusive prey. An entire ecosystem on a microscopic scale!